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French Property News

  • Up-and-coming Canal Saint Martin in Paris's 10th Arrondissement


    As more and more young creative types are choosing Paris's 10th arrondissement, Canal Saint Martin is becoming a hotbed for property buyers looking for long-term investment. The 10th arrondissement is limited by Canal Saint Martin to the east, Gare du Nord and Gare de l'Est stations to the north and Parc de Belleville to the south. Apartments in this north-eastern Paris district saw price increases of 7.3% in 2017 year-on-year. There are good public transport links with central Paris thanks to the two railway stations Gare du Nord and Gare de l'Est.

    The area has a young, vibrant feel, with plenty of wine bars, trendy cafés, galleries, record stores and chic boutiques to make a stroll through Canal Saint Martin a pleasure. The Canal feeds into the Seine and properties along this lovely watercourse fetch the highest prices, often several million euros. The district has featured in films like Amélie for example, its classic Haussmann architecture forming the background to an unforgettable romance. From the nearby Place de la Republique and the Marais, the Bastille and the Parc des Buttes Chaumont, Canal Saint Martin is full of old-fashioned charm and there are plenty of things to do for people buying a holiday apartment in this part of Paris.

    Per square metre property in Canal Saint Martin cost 8,622 euros at the end of 2017, which may seem high, but Paris is one of Europe's hottest property markets right now, and this north-eastern district is actually affordable by comparison with the 1st and 2nd arrondissements. Already fully modernised apartments and lofts sell for around 600,000 to 1,100,000 euros in this part of Paris. In the eastern part of Canal Saint Martin lofts and apartments are still being renovated, but a few developers are also starting to build new apartment blocks. Studios with views over the roofs of Rue Du Faubourg start at around 273,000 euros.

    The luxury sector of Paris's housing market is booming and many estate agents cite Canal Saint Martin in the 10th district as the next hot spot. The district is still undergoing gentrification, so there are still affordable holiday get-aways to be found and investors in Paris real estate can also look forward to healthy rental yields in this part of Paris. Studios are being let for between 960 euros and 1,300 euros, while one-bed apartments are typically being rented out for between 1,400 euros to 1,900 euros per calendar month. Two-bed room apartments with around 60sqm floorspace are being let for around 2,600 euros per month.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Paris Property remains the second most desirable in Europe in 2018


    According to a recent study conducted by estate agents Knight Frank International, which was based on the most desirable cities around the world, Paris's residential real estate market remains the most sought-after, at least for the super rich. The French capital saw a record price increase for residential properties last year, although Paris trailed behind London and ranked 12th in the world in terms of prices. However, investors are flocking back to Paris in increased numbers, despite the price hike.

    The super rich (those with an income in excess of 24 million euros a year) include buyers from the US, Europe and the Middle East, who look to the most central parts of Paris for their investments, namely the 1st, 6th and 7th arrondissements. High prices and lack of available housing stock has driven an increased number of investors to the 10th district, an up-and-coming arrondissement in the process of being gentrified.

    But there are signs that this price hike cannot last forever. According to the National Statistics Institute, in July 2018 fewer developers believed demand would continue at the same level for new properties as had been seen for the start of the year and during 2017. However, developers predict for the final quarter to come that demand will be slightly above long-term average, both for the rental sector as well as the first-time buyer segment of the market.

    There are indicators though that fewer developers believe an increase in the average new housing price will occur, a slight drop from the end of April. Developers were, however, confident that financing capacity to buy new housing would go up over the final quarter of the year.

    In the luxury sector, estate agents like Knight Frank are still enjoying a strong price growth year, following on from last year's successes. Knight Frank reported a 12% price increase in 2017 for Paris, when the French capital was the third best performer European-wide, according to Knight Frank's annual Prime International Residential Index (PIRI 100). PIRI 100 is based on the world's leading prime second home and city residential markets. For 2018, the estate agency's experts predict a 9% increase in prices for the luxury sector.

    Price growth in all segments of the market is likely to continue, given Brexit and the fact that Paris is to host the 2024 Olympic Games.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Thinking of retiring to France?


    Retiring to France is very appealing to many people, especially as many parts of France still offer excellent value for money in terms of residential property. In Limoge in the Haute-Vienne department for example, residents enjoy one of the sunniest climes in all of France, and the average house price is just 137,500 euros. The region also boasts a large number of museums and art galleries, making Limoges-Limousin area a favourite destination for culture tourism. So what's it like living in France as a retiree?

    Living Costs

    Although living costs are on average about 5% higher than in Britain, there are many things that are considerably cheaper in France, such as petrol for example and alcohol. Running costs for a home are about the same as in the UK, but food is more expensive. Renting a property is typically cheaper than in the UK, and tenants are more protected via long-term rental contracts. On the whole, living expenses in France are about the same as in the UK, with some notable exceptions, such as white goods being far more expensive in France for example.

    One thing British pensioners should bear in mind, when doing their comparison of living costs, is the volatile exchange rate. Pensions are paid as Sterling into European bank accounts, and with Pound Sterling being much weaker than the Euro at present, pensions suddenly do not stretch as far.

    French Healthcare for Retirees

    France can be justly proud of its healthcare system. A network of GP surgeries, similar to that of the UK, looks after the health of everyone. A great advantage of the French healthcare system is that insurers to not ask to see details of any pre-existing medical conditions, when an application is made via the Couverture Maladie Universelle (CMU). Applications are made via an E121/S1 form, which is issued by the Department of Work and Pensions. Applicants must forward this, when applying to the CMU.

    Patients pay a small flat fee, and every resident is a member of a minimum of three health insurance schemes that are non-profit bodies. It will depend on your income which one will be applicable to you, if you are still below pension age at the time of moving to France. Payments are made via various social charges, which do not apply to pensioners, who either pay nothing at all or a reduced charge, depending on which country they derive their pension from.

    Accessing accident and emergency services in France is free of charge, but everything else is charged at agreed rates. About 70% of this payment will eventually be reimbursed. Anyone needing long-term medical care or expensive treatments can usually get all of their money back. To be on the safe side, people retiring to France should take out private medical insurance to cover all eventualities. There are a large number of international insurers to choose from, offering comprehensive cover that often includes also dental care.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • More than 90 Million Tourists are expected to visit France in 2018


    This year France is welcoming a record number of tourists. Long queues in front of some of France's most iconic attractions, such as the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre and the medieval castle at Carcassonne, are now the norm. The tourism industry is struggling to cope with the large number of visitors, urging tourists to make their bookings online up to three months in advance. For owners of buy-to-let property this is going to be a bumper year.

    For many years now France has been the most popular tourist destination in the world. The country's tourism industry saw a downturn in 2015 and 2016, following terror attacks in Nice and Paris, but is now experiencing an unprecedented surge in visitor numbers, after a charm offensive and increased promotion. The tourism industry accounts for almost 10% of the country's GDP, providing around three million people with jobs.

    Tourism chiefs are worried that there may simply be too many tourist arriving now because, similar to what happened in parts of Spain, locals are voicing their concerns over such large numbers of visitors. Traditional systems dealing with the issue of tickets at tourist attractions for example simply cannot cope with the long queues.

    With more than 90 million tourists expeted this year, France is likely to see 100 million visitors by 2020. Last year, already 89 million tourists visited France. It was a record number, according to the Foreign Ministry, which looks after the tourism portfolio.

    Overnight stays amounted to 132.7 million, an incrase of 6.8% from 2016, according to the Ministry. Some 32.9% of these visitors originated from Russia and 22.1% from Japan. France's outstanding contribution to world heritage sites, the country's cuisine and culture are the main reasons cited for the high number of visitors coming to France every year.

    Many regions of France are still relatively undiscovered, offering investors in French property opportunities to buy houses that are suitable as holiday homes. Normandy for example is still affordable in many parts.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Normandy in Northern France


    The beautiful Normandy region lies in the north-west of France, and comprises of five distinct regions: Manche, Calvados, Seine-Maritime, Eure and Orne. Property prices on average increased by 7.76% in 2017 and France is still the world's most visited country in terms of tourism. With a budget of around 125,000 euros investors can buy a traditional farm house with 1.5 hectares of land in some parts of Manche and Orne.

    The main tourist attractions are Mont-St-Michel and the Bayeux Tapestry, the lovely coastal town of Honfleur, Caen and Rouen, as well as Deauville and the Pays d'Auge cider route in the Calvados region. The latter is an area where apple and pear orchards dominate the landscape, where sleepy villages full of thatched and half-timbered houses beckon visitors to linger. This is Calvados and cider country, and visiting a Calvados distillery is a must when travelling along the Pays d'Auge route.

    The principle town of the region is Lisieux, where Normandy's first Gothic cathedral, St-Pierre de Lisieux, still dominates the town centre. The Route de Cidre links the region's principle cider-making villages, which include charming, picturesque places like Bonnebosq and Cambremer.

    Created in the 1860s by three wealthy entrepreneurs, the seaside resort of Deauville and La Côte Fleurie make for a perfect holiday. Located between lovely Honfleur and Cabourg, this stretch of the Normandy coastline became fashionable in the 1920s. Deauville has its own race course, where horse-racing takes place, a famous casino and the luxurious Hôtel Normandy. The resort is brimming with boutiques and chic cafés, extravagant villas and a feeling of joie de vivre prevails.

    Honfleur is a picture-book dream of a seaside town, with cobbled streets and half-timbered houses. First mentioned in the 11th century, Honfleur is still a fishing port today, but visitors will also find modern attractions such as Musée Eugène Boudin, which houses 19th and 20th century art.

    In the Seine-Maritime, Rouen and the famous Cathédrale Notre-Dame are the star attraction for many pilgrims who travel to Normandy every year. Its stunning Gothic facade is famous, because the painter Monet depicted it in one of his paintings. Rouen Cathedral's construction began first in the middle of the 12th century, but destruction by fire meant that the present building dates mostly back to the 16th century.

    Travelling by bus or train is relatively easy in Normandy, thanks to an efficient and extensive bus and SNFC rail network. This makes Normany easily accessible for overseas tourist. The region has a robust private holiday lettings market.

    However, Normandy still offers first-time investors opportunities that are affordable. Village houses in need of modernisation can often be found for around 40,000 euros in the Orne region, which lies in the south of Normandy.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Cognac Country Poitou-Charentes


    Situated in the south-west of France, the area of Poitou-Charente is easily accessible via Poitou Airport and La Rochelle Airport. From Paris it is possible to take a direct TGV train from Charles-de-Gaulle Airport or from Montparnasse train station to Poitou. If you are looking to buy a townhouse, villa or farm house in Poitou-Charente, you will find plenty of choice at affordable prices.

    Poitou-Charente is divided into four departments, Charente, which was named after the Charente River, Charante-Maritime with its fine sandy beaches on France's Atlantic Coast, Deux-Sèvres and Vienne. To the south of the region is Bordeaux, France's famous wine-growing region.

    At the heart of the Poitou-Charente lies the ancient town of Angoulême, which was once the capital of the whole Cognac-producing region. It was once fortified with stout walls and protected by a castle. Only parts of this ancient structure survived, forming the basis for Angoulême's Town Hall now. Today the town sees a steady influx of tourists. The best months to visit the Poitou-Charente region are May, June and July.

    La Rochelle, a historic seaport on the Charente-Maritime's Bay of Biscay, is a busy tourist city thanks to its medieval towers and excellent restaurants and shopping. One of its attractions is the Musée de Marine, which displays the town's maritime history. La Rochelle was also the centre for French porcelain and faience production in the 18th century. Many fine examples are on display at the Orbigny-Bernon Museum in La Rochelle.

    Poitiers is simply brimming with palaces and Romanesque churches, while Jarnac, the site of the Battle of Jarnac in 1569, is an ideal place for walks and cycling along the Charente river.

    The town of Cognac in the Charente is at the heart of the country's famous fortified drink production. Cognac was once an important trading port; then wine producers discovered the double distillation process and the fortunes of this beautiful town changed forever. One of the most important visitor attractions is the Cognac Country Discovery centre. Both the Royal Castle of Cognac and Musée des Arts due Cognac are examples of the town's historic and contemporary importance for the Charente department. Smaller distilleries in the area also produce the Pineau aperitif.

    The Charente Valley is an often overlooked treasure trove of heritage towns of breath-taking beauty. For some 360 km the river cuts through rolling countryside filled with ancient water mills and sleepy villages.

    Property in the Poitou-Charente ranges from two-bed, already converted farm houses to large villas in need of restoration. With a budget of 88,000 euros it is possible to find a small holiday hideaway in a sleepy village. A budget of around 230,000 euros buys a substantial property for relocation purposes or retirement in rural areas.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Cognac Country Poitou-Charentes


    Situated in the south-west of France, the area of Poitou-Charente is easily accessible via Poitou Airport and La Rochelle Airport. From Paris it is possible to take a direct TGV train from Charles-de-Gaulle Airport or from Montparnasse train station to Poitou. If you are looking to buy a townhouse, villa or farm house in Poitou-Charente, you will find plenty of choice at affordable prices.

    Poitou-Charente is divided into four departments, Charente, which was named after the Charente River, Charante-Maritime with its fine sandy beaches on France's Atlantic Coast, Deux-Sèvres and Vienne. To the south of the region is Bordeaux, France's famous wine-growing region.

    At the heart of the Poitou-Charente lies the ancient town of Angoulême, which was once the capital of the whole Cognac-producing region. It was once fortified with stout walls and protected by a castle. Only parts of this ancient structure survived, forming the basis for Angoulême's Town Hall now. Today the town sees a steady influx of tourists. The best months to visit the Poitou-Charente region are May, June and July.

    La Rochelle, a historic seaport on the Charente-Maritime's Bay of Biscay, is a busy tourist city thanks to its medieval towers and excellent restaurants and shopping. One of its attractions is the Musée de Marine, which displays the town's maritime history. La Rochelle was also the centre for French porcelain and faience production in the 18th century. Many fine examples are on display at the Orbigny-Bernon Museum in La Rochelle.

    Poitiers is simply brimming with palaces and Romanesque churches, while Jarnac, the site of the Battle of Jarnac in 1569, is an ideal place for walks and cycling along the Charente river.

    The town of Cognac in the Charente is at the heart of the country's famous fortified drink production. Cognac was once an important trading port; then wine producers discovered the double distillation process and the fortunes of this beautiful town changed forever. One of the most important visitor attractions is the Cognac Country Discovery centre. Both the Royal Castle of Cognac and Musée des Arts due Cognac are examples of the town's historic and contemporary importance for the Charente department. Smaller distilleries in the area also produce the Pineau aperitif.

    The Charente Valley is an often overlooked treasure trove of heritage towns of breath-taking beauty. For some 360 km the river cuts through rolling countryside filled with ancient water mills and sleepy villages.

    Property in the Poitou-Charente ranges from two-bed, already converted farm houses to large villas in need of restoration. With a budget of 88,000 euros it is possible to find a small holiday hideaway in a sleepy village. A budget of around 230,000 euros buys a substantial property for relocation purposes or retirement in rural areas.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Starting a Business in France


    Starting a new life in France needn't be complicated, as there are many things that can be done while you are still living in your own country. English-speaking estate agents are always willing to help with advice and information, helping you through the complex process of buying an affordable property in France. If you are hoping to start a business in France, the French government has already started to make the process faster and easier by putting information online. Starting a business in France takes between 5 and 7 days, so is not a drawn-out process, provided you get the basics right.

    Types of Business Registrations

    It is important to note that not all businesses have to follow the same process of registration. In France registration will depend on the nature of your business. For example, some types of business must be registered at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. These are mainly sole proprietorships that are not involved in crafts or creative arts.

    Artisans and companies that involve crafts must register at the Chamber of Trade, while commercial agents and professionals must register at the Registry of Commerce. This can now be done online at https://www.infogreffe.com (English-language site).

    What type of corporate entities are there in France?

    The most common types of business entities are:

    sole proprietorship (Entreprise Individuelle), usually chosen by artisans and sole traders, but this type of company foundation comes with full liability for any potential debts; sole proprietorship with limited responsibility for liabilities (EIRL or Enterprise Individuelle à Responsibilité Limitée); commercial partnership (Societé en Nom Collectif or SNC); limited liability company (Societé à Responsabilité Limitée or SARL); French joint stock company (Societé Anonyme or SA); simplified stock corporation ( Societé par Actions Simplifée or SAS).

    Sole traders or proprietors do not need to invest any capital to register their company.

    The SA set-up, or joint stock company, tends to be more burdened by administrative requirements. It requires 7 shareholders to set up the company. Shares can be traded on the stock exchange. The risk to investors is the amount initially paid in.

    The SARL set-up of a company is very similar to the LLC in the USA or forming a private company limited by shareholding in Britain. The requirement is for the SARL to be established by 2 to 50 shareholders and the company must have a nominated director, who often receives a salary.

    To set up a simplified stock corporation or SAS takes a minimum of two share holders. The company's shares cannot be publicly traded.

    Setting up a company such as a SARL for example requires several documents:

    Articles of Incorporation, which all concerned in the set-up of the business must sign in the month prior to registering your company Notice of company formation, published online in a legal gazette and Proof of address for your business

    These documents must be taken, together with the named director's proof of identity, to the local "Centre de Formalités des Entreprises", or CFE. However, some of this process has now been simplified by being put online: https://www.cfenet.cci.fr. The site is at the time of writing only available in French. Registration of your company may cost around 300.00 euros.

    If your application is accepted, you will receive a receipt. This allows you to open a bank account for your business, and you can make other preparations for your business. However, at this point you will not be allowed to trade.

    The CFE will pass on your application details to all relevant authorities. Once your registration process is complete, you will be sent a certificate. At this point you are free to trade.

    Company Registration Numbers

    Any newly registered business is given a company registration number, or SIRET. This number has 14 digits, which also contain the company's SIREN number. SIREN comprises of the first 9 digits of the SIRET number. Any business registering will also be given an APE code, a 5-digit number that identifies the business activity.

    In addition, companies may have to register for VAT, depending on their type of business activity and volume of trading. At the time of writing, the standard VAT rate in France is 20%.

    If you do not speak French and want to avoid paying a translator, you can simply hire a law firm to set up the company for you. This will cost more, but avoid pitfalls and speed up the process of your application.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Guide to retiring to France


    France still offers retirees some amazing property bargains, if you're prepared to spend a little time and money to do up an old farm house or historic town-house. From mountainous landscapes to rolling green hills, from the City of Light to the beaches of the French Riviera, France has a huge amount to offer, despite the country's reputation as a high tax jurisdiction that targets foreigners in particular. French President Macron's reforms to the tax legislation will eventually benefit everyone, including expats, provided his reforms make it past the protesters. With Brexit looming for British retirees and the City of London's financial sector workers especially, Paris has seen unprecedented demand for apartments and town houses of late, something that has been reflected in surging house prices for the French capital. However, elsewhere in rural France it is still possible to find a dream retirement home for under £300,000.

    Taxation

    France can be a tax-efficient place to live during one's retirement, providing you understand the tax implications of your situation and obtain tax advice from a specialist lawyer who understands both taxation and legislation of your home country as well as those of France.

    The French taxman will consider you a tax resident if your main home (called foyer) is in France if you spend 183 days and more in France during the French tax year (which corresponds to the calendar year), or if you spend more time in France than in any other country, or if your principal activity is based in France, or if France is home to your most substantial assets.

    Although many French taxes carry a similar name as the ones in Britain, they are calculated in a totally different way. Some do not even exist in the UK, such as wealth tax for example, or for some people, healthcare charges.

    Cost of living in France

    For Britons retiring to France, there will be exchange rate implications due to the weakness of the Pound against the Euro. Your UK pension will be paid in Sterling, and will thus be reduced or enhanced by whatever the exchange rate of the day is going to be. This means if Brexit affects the value of Sterling further in a negative way, your pension won't stretch as far as you might have hoped and buying a French home will be more expensive.

    Over the past ten years the cost of living in France has risen considerably. But this should be seen in relation to where you live. Buying a home in Paris has gone up by between 70% and 95%, compared to purchasing a home in the south of France, such as Marseille, Nice or Perpignan. Similarly, things like renting, food, public transport and going out are far more expensive in Paris than they are in other parts of the country.

    This is also true for utility costs, which are mostly cheaper than they are in the rest of the European Union, except for water, which is among the most expensive utilities in the world and can vary considerably from French region to region. However, food, beer and wine, public transport, entertainment and property tend to be cheaper than they are in the UK and some of the original EU countries.

    French Healthcare

    France's healthcare system is regarded as one of the best in the world. Good news for anyone hoping to retire to France: the country's public and private hospitals offer a similarly high standard of care and there are no significant waiting lists for operations and no struggle to find hospital beds for patients either.

    Until the UK leaves the European Union for good, British citizens and retirees in receipt of a state pension from another EU country are entitled to a contribution from the French government of 70% of the cost of treatment. You can get cheap and mandatory top-up insurance to cover the remainder.

    EU citizens retiring before qualifying for a state pension can receive French social security health cover for up to 30 months, providing they obtain an E106 form from their country’s social security department, before they leave for France.

    Some non-EU citizens qualify for receiving totally or at least partially free French state healthcare, depending on their country’s reciprocal social security agreements.

    Those not entitled to receive free healthcare in France will need private health insurance. If you live permanently in France, this will be a "voluntary insurance" policy (called assurance volontaire). The national health service does, however, cover the cost of all treatment for life-threatening illnesses and accidents.

    Buying Property in France

    The French property market also took a hit during the world-wide economic crisis of 2008, but in the always sought-after regions of the Alps, Paris and the Cote d’Azur, confidence among home buyers and investors is gradually returning. In many other parts of the country, especially in rural areas, prices continue to drop, so now is a good time to buy a retirement home in France, before buyers are priced out of Paris and other sought-after areas and driven back to rural areas.

    In some parts of the country home values have fallen by up to 40% since prices peaked in 2007. With Sterling performing badly against the euro, buying a home in France has become more expensive for British retirees since the Brexit referendum in June 2016.

    However, British buyers are still keen to buy French property in the capital, the Alps and along the Cote d’Azur, but they need bigger budgets these days to be successful. What is evident is that the desire to buy a dilapidated farmhouse to do it up is waning. Brits now buying are more likely to choose off-plan properties and somewhere that has good rental potential long-term. Many people are apparently choosing to buy their retirement home well in advance, and are thus looking to rent it out until they are ready to make their permanent move to France. This means buying a property near excellent amenities within walking distance, close to restaurants, the beach or within a ski resort and close to an airport - preferably one served by low-cost airlines.

    Settling into your French retirement home

    French people are more reserved, generally speaking, than their Italian or Spanish counterparts, so it takes more of an effort to get to know them. Learning French is essential, if you are planning to retire or relocate to France. Expat organisations such as InterNations.org or aaro.org, the Association of American Residents Overseas can provide valuable advice about day-to-day living in France, and also help with integration, as they list local expat groups where one can make new friends.

    InterNations is one of the world's leading networks for expats in 390 cities worldwide, while AARO has its headquarter in Paris and is an international, non-partisan association with members in 21 countries that researches issues that might significantly affect the lives of American citizens living overseas and keeps them abreast of such issues. Local embassies and Chambers of Commerce are also excellent sources of information. The US embassy provides its citizens with information on issues as diverse as childcare, American clubs in the overseas country, Veterans affairs, education and sports, for example.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com

  • Is this the Paris Property Market's Rebirth?


    By November 2017, Paris property prices had reached a new record high: house buyers now had to find a record-breaking 9,000 euros per square metre on average, if they wanted to become the owner of a Paris property. According to the LPI-Se Loger barometer for October 2017, properties in twelve of the French capital's arrondissements or districts cost 9,165 per square metre.

    Indeed, all of Paris' twenty arrondissements recorded significant price increases with an average annual rise of at least 8%.

    Brexit, so both Bloomberg and The Financial Times reported, was also helping "to push Paris property prices towards record levels". Britons desperate to gain a permanent foothold in an EU country applied in record numbers for French passports - and sought a home in Paris. A recent report by French notaries showed that British buyers were especially looking in some of the city's most exclusive districts.

    "The number of buyers is rising unstoppably," stated Paris notary Thierry Delesalle, adding that demand was outstripping supply, especially for the best properties in prime areas, "and perhaps because of Brexit."

    Britons accounted for 10% of all foreign buyers, making them the second most enthusiastic group of buyers after Italians (17%).

    According to industry experts, sales increased by 7% in just one year in Paris and with the French capital set to host the 2024 Olympics, there's no telling how high prices will go for the capital's residential real estate. Demand and sales activity will only increase.

    INSEE, the country's official body of notaries, said that the number of sales in France as a whole also reached a record high of 952,000 in the twelve months to end-September and there has been no let up since.


    Article by Maria Thermann on behalf of Propertyshowrooms.com